Archbeer.com

Archbeer.com is an independent informal site for beer enthusiasts, providing information on specific beer brands tested by guitarist Archaon of the Norwegian black metal band 1349.

Ratings

The beers reviewed are rated on a scale ranging from 1 to 6 based on the following parameters:

  • Color
  • Consistency/texture
  • Fragrance
  • Elements of taste and aftertaste
  1. Disgusting (rather drink water)
  2. Poor/boring (somewhat drinkable, but nothing more than that)
  3. Ok (meets expectations)
  4. Good (above average and high quality in terms of taste)
  5. Splendid (top notch; a joy to consume every drop)
  6. Out-of-body experience (absolutely supreme taste and presentation)

Ukategorisert

Another thrill to be experienced is here, in this can in front of me… and just by the odours, I can tell that we’re in for a treat. This dark yellow hop-soup gives associations to an orange soft drink that’s been a fave of mine since childhood. As I put my nose closer, I can sense notes of caramel. Deep yellow in colour, and pours a very fine head. I cannot hold back any longer…

WOW!! Light and bubbly. Immensely fruity and fresh, and with a multiple taste. Hoppy as hell, but not the directly bitter-hoppy way I am used to in double IPAs. First and foremost, it is the ripe fruityness and mango-notes that takes place in this one. Incredibly delicious, rounded off with a sweet drape. (To quote my better half: “Even the burp tastes good!”) There are also citric traces of orange, lemon and even spruce in here. Absolutely astonishing!

After the beautiful middle and great body, there is a small tingly hoppy heat to be sensed, before a long round aftertaste signs off. By far one of the best double IPAs I’ve ever tasted in my life. Hands down.

(A huge thanks to Espen @ Westum homebrewery!)

 

Photo: M.K. Burheim

Today, I’m in company with a fantastic beverage from Kansas… looks fantastic. Beautiful color in the glass. Nose is rose and subtle fruityness. Gooseberries and red currants is what comes to mind here. Judging by The looks I’d say it’s very little carbonation going on here… Let’s check it out.

Well, that was something quite different!There is definitely carbonation here, although it pours no head. At first, the tastebuds are paralysed by the extremely tart shock! Really, just extremely acidic before blending in with it’s seducing fruityness… almost like lemonade.

There is no defusing sweetness here, only hard-core sour attack. But a beautiful one for sure. Great maturity too… Leaving sour berries down your throat for aftertaste. Very, very nice (and I’m happy this wasn’t stored any longer!)

 

Photo: M.K. Burheim

Now, this should be quite interesting… Having saved this bottle of excitement for merely almost a decade, it is now time to taste it and see what’s in store.

Pouring reveals a devilish black color, whilst notes of licorice, fruits, dark berries strikes the nose. According to the description that I find this is supposed to be a triple/black IPA. I must say and admit that I am highly excited now! It somehow reminds me a little of Brewdog’s other flagship, Tactical nuclear penguin (albeit in a lighter version). Let’s get down & dirty…

Not at all as expected. That is the first thing that comes to mind- there is absolutely no combination left in this beer and the taste is mildly put… ehrm, mild. With no bubbles going on at all, I must say it’s over its peak for sure. Can’t say that I’m that surprised considering the length of storage 😅 What can I say about taste here though… mild, lightly hoppy (probably lost most of it along the way). Quite dead and bland now, not even traces of heat to be found. Well well, tick the box, I suppose one can say.

 

Photo: M. Burheim

It is always interesting to come across a brewery that one hasn’t tried something from before.

This German brewery has thus collaborated with Denmarks To Øl, in order to serve this bright-yellow beauty. For starters, it seems well carbonated with a great head when being poured- and the nose is nothing but splendid. According to the bottle information, this is a rose hip-infused sour rye pilsener, and flower’ish, mineral/fruity citrus notes does subtly emerge. Also acidic hints. 

When it comes to taste however, it starts off with a quick flirtation with sweetness before the acidity undoubtedly shows it’s presence… very sour for this type of beer to be. Very fruity middle with bitter high end to it. Also, it’s quite salty and I find hints of seaweed in here. Mildly sour aftertaste that evaporates quickly.

Very nice and fresh, this one.

 

Photo: M. K. Burheim

Joyful summertimes

A bright shining star on the sky of what arguably is becoming a slightly saturated market (?) in Oslo, the craft beer scene, was the festival called Håndverksøl-festivalen.

Taking place on the dates 15 & 16th of June, this festival gathered some brilliant breweries from around the globe. Arranged by the nice people from the brilliant Oslo pub Café Sara, brings tremendous amounts of joy on these couple of summerdays whilst the festival happens.

The arrangers had brought together breweries from several countries and continents who provided the people of the Norwegian capitol with several thirst-quenching highlights. Among the breweries were Captain Lawrence, Wild Beer, Nøgne Ø, Firestone Walker, Cascade, Alesmith, 3 fonteinen, Dugges, Northern Munk, 7 Fjell, Lervig, Ægir, De Molen and a bunch of others.

(For complete listing, see the festival’s website: www.håndverksølfestivalen.no)

 

Dark Horizon 1

Nøgne Ø even threw a tasting of their famous flagship “Dark Horizon”. To be exact, they’d dug up a few bottles of the 1st edition, to many of the participants joy. Another cool factor that should be mentioned is that the festival takes place both outdoors as well as inside a church (!!), where the faith in craft beer reigns heavily.

What you got here is a bunch of  top notch craftbreweries, that team up to serve the interested lot what they wish for… And so much more. A really pleasant first-timer here.

Amongst all the festivals taking place throughout the year, this is for sure one to note down next year!

I am familiar with the Delirium series from before, and from what I can remember, this is good stuff. What’s on today’s menu is their 25th anniversary “Argentum”, a hopped amber beer. When poured, it’s got a nice look to it; yellow brownish (maaaaybe a hint of red!) visuals and a good head. As far as aromas go, this smells refreshingly fruity with clear hints to citrus. A very clean impression is what I get… I can’t hold it any longer, let’s get to the taste.

Lot’s of bubbles! Carbonation level is great here, very fresh. Medium/full body. Extremely dry! A fruity, floral first impression which soon turns into absolute hop-dominance in form of a stingy bitter outro… A bit too much for my taste really. The aftertaste is just to bitter for my liking. Not eligible for a second purchase, so to speak- will go for another one from the Delirium series in that case.

(Photo: M. K. Burheim)

 

RODENBACH 2017I know when opening this bottle, that I’m in for a treat. I’ve tasted quite a few flanders now and I never seem to go tired of a good one… Which brings us to this magnificent gold-awards winner.

The colour is strikingly ruby red, on the verge to light brown, but still letting shimmering light through. As for the nose: Here we are faced with ripeness all the way; nice notes of cherries, red currant and it has a strawberry-like sweetness to it.

So, lets get down to it and what one really is waiting for: Tasting. There’s bubbles giving the first fresh introduction, natural sweetness, exiting sour elements comes forth and tingles the tongue, even more so strawberry than in the aroma. A massive fruit infusion combined with mateurity.

Absolutely splendid, this is it!

Boot boysIntriguing label & name from these (seemingly) punks are paired with positive assocciations from earlier tastings.

A brown ale is what we’re in for from these Brits, and visually striking brown transparency colour. Perfect head is poured and exitement boosted as fruity aromas of dried dates, mature plum and caramel-notes comes forth. There’s also clearly nutty aroma to this one. Yes, I do inhale!

As for the taste: It is very mild and a bit light… Not exactly watery, but little edge to it. Really nice sweet middle which lingers for a bit. Taste of (I was about to say wet autumn leaves!) sap, with that sweetnote on top. A mild and far from controversial ale, but hey- whoever said brown ales would promise anything else than that), but overall well-tasty.

Will try their beers again, when the opportunity sees the light of day.

 

(Photo: M. Brochs)

MolenbierSo, another one from De Molen is what we are faced with here. The actual beer has a smooth wooden-brown colour to it and pours a small creamy head on top. I am usually very fond of their brews, at least what I have tasted from this brewery so far. This one is a lighter type though, so there’s some degree of excitement “in the air tonight».

With regards to aroma: There’s a fruityness of figs/fig jam, some oak and quite distinct malt character. I find some nuance of coffee too, even more so defined in the taste, which enhances the previously observed wooden impression. There’s also taste of roasted chestnut here, very suitable for this time of the year, at which it’s consumed. Santa would’ve sled right down the chimney for a taste of this.

At first, it’s got a sweet malt-orientated introduction and dried dates, before evolving into more powerful, dark roasted beans and at the end, rounded off with a very hoppy bitterness.

There’s not much bubbly action going on here, but that’s not missed either in this type of beer. Nice one, De Molen!

(Photo: M. Brochs)

Tokyo craft pale aleThis beer is the first one to be reviewed here following last month’s Japan tour. The fragrances are flowery fruity and by looks it is a bright yellow beer which shows rather great degrees of carbonation. More nutty fruit-like with a hint of pears, underlying notes at least. So; what does it taste?  The land of the sun here brings us a fresh crisp pale ale with definite traces of pear and chestnut, boosted with the hefty carbonation. A great representative for Japan’s passion to the art of brewing, this one. It also maintains a quite heavy malty power throughout  the whole mouth feel, leaving a subtle caramelish postludium.  Another reason to love this exiting country!

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