Archbeer.com

Archbeer.com is an independent informal site for beer enthusiasts, providing information on specific beer brands tested by guitarist Archaon of the Norwegian black metal band 1349.

Ratings

The beers reviewed are rated on a scale ranging from 1 to 6 based on the following parameters:

  • Color
  • Consistency/texture
  • Fragrance
  • Elements of taste and aftertaste
  1. Disgusting (rather drink water)
  2. Poor/boring (somewhat drinkable, but nothing more than that)
  3. Ok (meets expectations)
  4. Good (above average and high quality in terms of taste)
  5. Splendid (top notch; a joy to consume every drop)
  6. Out-of-body experience (absolutely supreme taste and presentation)

Other

This one has been lying around for a good while… Saving the best for the last-thingy. Being familiar with these guys from before, I’m expecting tons of deliciousness and enormous fruitiness, all entangled inside this blood red contents.

If you’re into mead, this is the thing for you- from Norway. Nose revealing massive amounts of cherries, a vineous yet sweet experience out of the ordinary. As for the taste, it can best be described as imperial- no, divine… or “next level” at the very least. This is the grand stuff, and really delivers what it promises: Cherry delight goodness. Sweet ‘n fruity, thick/full body and dangerously seductive. One almost can’t believe that it is as strong as it is, but be aware: Hidden weapons are present here. This is powerful stuff in all meanings of the word possible. Amazing.


Photo: D. Brochs


Having been looking forward to this for a good while, it’s time to crack it open. What we are talking about here is a mead of the best sort- namely a cherry mead from Norwegian fellas Marlobobos megabear. From what I have heard, the expectations that are high is not without reason. Also, judging by the collar when pouring this beauty into the glass, it reminds most about a fine port wine/sherry of sorts, and the fumes are to become religious by…

Absolutely devastating. Cherry-delish. Let’s get down to it!

By the first sip: This is perfection that my wife’s mother would’ve loved, man. Insane wows are what exits my mouth when this goes into it! Absolutely sick. Beautifully silky smooth, deep fruity notes, mainly cherry (of course), but also Christmas pastry-like hints, rounded off by velvety smooth edge. Note to higher powers: If I could swim in this for a lifetime, that’s where I’d be reincarnated, pretty please.

This tremendous joy in the night owes a shout out to M. Loktu & Marlobobos megabear. Cheers!

 

(Photo: M.K. Burheim)

IMG_9898Looks like a proper lager… a bit weak Head. The nose is malts, subtle as one can get it… hard to find much more here. (As expected) taste? Pretty foul. Weak is an understatement, smells and tastes more metallic than beer, and that taste is barely detectable before disappearing into wateryness. Luckily, the white month I’m on is soon to come to an end…

StedjaIn looks, we’re confronted here with a light brown beverage, which by the looks of it contains close to no carbonization. The node is… HORRIBLE! At first at least, that is. There’s some old Apple juice/molten berries in here, infused with a tad of honey. Tastewise, it’s a completely different story; it’s got hints of liqourice, and a hard-to-describe fruityness. Still some honey in it. The aftertaste evolves into more sweet landscapes. Interesting is my conclusion with this awkard Joe.

KentuckyRCHere we have a beer brewed on an amber ale- recipé, to then be aged in rye whisky barrels. Stating that “contains anything but chicken”, the funny decorative bottle/label should make even the most hardcore vegetarian (with a sense of humour) intrigued. (Bottle also rolled in tar & feathers) Well, enough about image, let’s get onto the taste experience here… Nose being sharp bourbon-reference more than anything, the level of carbonization (or lack thereof) makes it all a little flat. Brown and mirky appearance so to speak, this one reminds me of Nøgne Ø’s “Sunturnbrew (although this one is better tasting), for those of you that’ve crossed paths with that one. The funny, priceless label served it’s purpose. The good taste of the Amber/malts are there early, to be dominated by bourbon later. There’s no bitterness to be traced, but some sweetness. The aftertaste is simply watered out whisky/bourbon. Could have had an overall more dry sense, I’m of the perception that it would have helped. However, well-tasting in it’s category, by all means.

imageGoldlike yellow colour, on the verge to light brown and highly inviting. Looks very smooth judging by the head when pouring, almost creamy-like. Nose is delicious, lighly fruity behind a veil of sweet summerly hints. Massive malt body entagled with a well tasting ale, which is given a untraditional charater by the tea-taste… Kind of reminds me of a hybrid merge between ice tea and beer, but in a successful manner. Summer, flowers and night-time tea is pretty accurately what comes to mind here. Eceptionally great experience.

imageThe aroma somewhat reflects the yeast and a light fruity vibe. Yellow beverage with just about what’s needed of fizz, the taste is summed up by belgian-infused with mild acidic vibe to it, with a touch of sweetness midway through and rounded off with taste of an IPA. Kind of combining two great worlds, but I can’t help thinking that it’s a bit pecculiar, the balance of sweet belgian and hoppy bitterness. However, works though.

imageNice brown colour, smells of caramel and subtly of coffee. Tastes even more so and then with more distinct coffee-notes. Sweet from the caramel combined with bitter coffee, tasty with soil and nutty hints and with malts in centre, dominating. Fullbodied and with longlasting taste. One of the better brown ales around.

imageThe label states that we’re about to become familiar with an “English style IPA”. Colourwise, it is quite clear golden-like, and nose is fruity. In taste it’s not too carbonized, just about right and it is an easy-to-drink, well tasty fruity beer that seems very right for summertimes. At first surprisingly mild, but an underlying bitter feature comes to show increasingly. Can best be described as a hybrid where an old English ale crosses over and meets an IPA. The malts dominates at the start, but the bitterness becomes more and more present throughout.

GrenadierThe noticeably mirky colour raises exitementlevels to high, with this hay-like yellow beverage in the glass. Smells very fruity, a lot of lime/citric influence (naturally enough, as the bottle label reads Pomegranate as a main ingredient). Generous carbonization going on here. Oustandingly acidic, escalating from beginning to midway through- as a matter of fact, the acidity lies there all the way, competing with the sweetness known from typichal-belgian style. Longlasting taste too.

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